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The Dark Knight Rises: Is The Batwing Back?

We seem to be getting updates on Batman almost everyday now, and having just come back from my holiday yesterday, I have returned, as I guessed I would, to more big updates, including an image of the Nolan-esque Catwoman (Anne Hathaway) on set. However, as sexy as a woman in a leather cat outfit is, I’m pretty sure there has been a lot more uproar on the leak of some new videos and images showing another vehicle from Christopher Nolan’s upcoming Bat-finale, The Dark Knight Rises.

The most recent business online is that this peculiar vehicle may in fact be the Caped Crusader’s method of air transport – The Batwing. For those of you who remember Batman Forever, the Batwing was briefly used in the movie, before being taken down by Two-Face and The Riddler. However, although it had a pretty cool looking Batwing and was a better movie than Batman & Robin, Batman Forever isn’t even a tiny drop of water trailing down the side of the full glass of water that is Batman Begins and The Dark Knight; and other than Forever and the Batwing from Batman (1989), there aren’t really any huge versions of the Batwing to compare against, other than that portrayed in the comics. So perhaps The Dark Knight Rises will be the one to truly show off the amazing technology that Batman really packs…not that it needs to be any more amazing (I mean, a Batmobile…with a built-in motorbike?!) Check out a video of what may be the Batwing, being transported to the Wabash Tunnel in Pittsburgh:

I would say this is exciting stuff, but it would appear that this movie slowly seems to be getting ruined by the day, and with the possibility of some big spoilers having already been revealed, I really hope nothing else too major spills itself on to the internet before this release. However, I’m sure there are still plenty of big secrets under wraps which will remain there, and not to mention, it is The Dark Knight Rises, so how can you not be excited?!

The Dark Knight Rises is expected to hit cinema screens on the 20th July, 2012, so book a day off.

By Manpreet Singh


Akira

Akira was a revolutionary film which was made in 1988 directed by Katsuhiro Otomo based on the original manga. Akira was the first anime film to be properly recognized in the western society opening the road for future Japanese animation.

The film is based in 2019 after the third world war which happened in 1988 within this film. The opening scene involves a biker gang fight which introduces the main characters quickly and effectively. This quickly leads on to an event where one of the main characters is injured in an accident after coming in to contact with an unknown supernatural entity. This concludes with his friends discovering him in this state. While the characters are panicking they are surprised by an army helicopter blinding them. While this happens the injured character is abducted by the government. Once being abducted the character is found to have potential psychic abilities, thus being forced in to a secret program by the government.

This leads to a psychological thrill ride with a complex accompanying story. Some of the main points of this that makes the film great is the films ability to make you think. This film created questions in the mind of the viewer of how they would react if they were in the same situation. The main character is given such an immense power within the film he struggles to control this emotionally and physically. This allows the viewer to show empathy towards the main character allowing them to put themselves in the protagonist’s shoes asking the question ‘would I be able to control this power?’

Another major positive of this film is it does not force you to see the scenario this film presents from one characters view. It allows you to see parts of the film through the protagonist’s eyes as well as the main hero’s. This allows you to take a more analytical view upon the film sparking off an unbiased debate of your morality. This does have a negative aspect to itself as well. It stops the viewer forming a good emotional connection with one specific character but in the end allows a general overview of every character.

The film’s scenes are greatly complimented with its unique music. The music varies scene to scene appropriately sparking off emotion within the viewer allowing a greater connection to the plot, characters and the scenes. The film even in present age has dated very well being visual stunning still in this day and age.

To conclude this film it is a very enjoyable film allowing you to spark of debate within yourself about your own morality as well as pleasing visuals and music. The only main negative I can express is due to its presentation of characters it prevents the viewer from forming any emotional bond with an individual character. Well worth a watch if you get the chance.

Written by

Richard Broadhead (with input from Anthony Ball and Ben Leonard)


Laurence Fishburne Will Play Daily Planet Editor In ‘Superman: Man Of Steel’

Although the actual film is scheduled to be released in June 2013, almost all of the roles are already taken for the new reboot of Superman.
Laurence Fishburne is the newest addition as the Daily Planet Editor-in-chief, Perry White.

The new Perry White in the Superman reboot

I’m a little bit confused to the casting, he is a brilliant actor, but I do not think he suits this role at all. I always imagine the Daily Planet Editor-in-chief to be quite a nervous person, and lacking confidence. Laurence can do much stronger roles than this. However he is cast now.

Lets just hope this Superman reboot lives to expectations. Directed by Zack Snyder, Man of Steel is set to hit cinema screens on the 14th June, 2013 in the US, and will star Henry Cavill as Superman/Clark Kent, Amy Adams as Lois Lane, with the character of Jor-El to be played by Russell Crowe.

Source: Digital Spy


Captain America: The First Avenger – Verdict

Captain America: The First Avenger is the latest Marvel comic-to-movie release, and the final movie tie-in with the hugely anticipated The Avengers, which is due for release on 4th May next year. The story revolves around Steve Rogers, played by Chris Evans (Fantastic Four) – a young man who has failed to gain entry into the military service numerous times, mostly thanks to his asthma and general physical attributes. However, his determination and perseverance keep him going long enough for someone to notice him – Dr. Abraham Erskine (Stanley Tucci, The Lovely Bones). Dr Erskine notices Rogers, and offers him the opportunity he’s been struggling to find. Enter Captain America – a chemically-enhanced super soldier, fighting for America and everything it stands for.

Now, although I haven’t read any of the comics associated with Captain America, after having done a little research into it, and having asked reliable sources, the general structure of the storyline and character seems to match the comics quite well, going along the same, main lines. The movie is set in the 1940’s, in particular, during the World War 2 period. The main villain is a man named Johann Schmidt, also known as the Red Skull (Hugo Weaving), a man associated with Adolf Hitler, who is head of a secret research department known as HYDRA in Nazi Germany.

The storyline was actually quite a strong one, detailing Rogers before his enhancement, as a wimpy, below-average build man, who, although is ignored by everyone, is always determined, never giving up. As he is perhaps the most determined and brave person Dr Erskine has seen, he selects him to take part in Project Rebirth. Due to this reason, the beautiful Peggy Carter also takes an interest in him, played by Hayley Atwell.

I have to say, along with the strong and developing storyline, I particularly enjoyed the sub-story, of the relationship between Steve and Peggy, and how even though they are on opposite ends of the spectrum (nerdy, wimpy to graceful, beautiful), Peggy still takes an interest in Steve…and even more so after his transformation. It’s interesting to watch the relationship between the two, and see how it progresses; and even though many parts of the storyline, if not most, are quite predictable, it’s still enjoyable to watch the progression.

Another thing most Marvel flicks tend to infuse into their movies is comedy. And in the case of this movie, is generally worked. There were a range of comical scenes in the movie, and they manage to actually make you laugh. From stupid comedy to sarcasm, it works well with this movie. The role of Colonel Chester Phillips played by Tommy Lee Jones, in particular was quite enjoyable from a comical aspect, being the rough colonel-type character you’d expect, yet being humourous through sarcastic and blunt means.

I was expecting this movie to boast about the US in a patriotic manner as much as possible, but I was quite surprised to see it didn’t really do this much. Other than the American-themed costume, there wasn’t really any huge biased message, trying to make America seem better than every other country (well, no more biased than the usual amount in other movies anyway). And the scenes, along with the feelings to the scenes matched the year they were set in well, making you feel like you were actually experiencing a story set in the 1940’s, giving a good, nostalgic feeling.

Now, being the movie that this is, I was expecting huge action scenes. However, I was somewhat disappointed on this aspect. Don’t get me wrong, the action scenes were good, and I enjoyed the way Captain America smashed the bad guys around, socking it to ’em with his harder-than-hard shield (definitely want one of these), along with the rest of the action; however, none of it striked me as anything spectacular. This somewhat disappointed me, as I also felt that a lot of action scenes which could have been great were rushed quite a bit, though I suppose there was a more of a focus on the storyline in this movie, as opposed to the action – though this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, providing the movie can pull of a decent storyline. Luckily this movie did, keep you interested throughout; although, being the movie that it is, I would have enjoyed some more spectacular action. Although again, I suppose there is a limit to what you can do with a pistol, shield and optimum human power…

The enjoyable storyline continued right through to the end, with what I thought to be quite a good ending. I won’t say anymore as I don’t want to give anything away, except for that it manages to suitably tie-in with The Avengers at the end. And to those of you with little patience like me, I know it’s hard work, sitting through the credits which seem to go on forever, but there is an Avengers-themed surprise after the credits, which I’m sure many of you expected; although a lot of people at the cinema showing I went to seemed to forget that this movie ties in with The Avengers, running off as soon as the movie finished. But stay right till the end.

To sum up, although I’m sure this would be a much more enjoyable watch for you Captain America fans, I still found this to be quite an enjoyable movie. With a good storyline, decent action sequences, and enjoyable, and somewhat unique sub-plots to it, it was worth a watch. Remember, this is coming from a person who never read the comics, and had no expectations of this movie before watching it. I felt it was also a good lead-up to what will indeed be a spectacular movie, The Avengers – I mean, after all, Captain America is The First Avenger.

iHartMovies Rating: 3.8/5

By Manpreet Singh


New Shots Of Batman, Bane and Batpod From The Dark Knight Rises Set

Some of you may see these images as possible plot spoilers, so be wary.

New photos from the set of the hugely anticipated The Dark Knight Rises have hit the net. A few images have been revealed, featuring an image of Batman (Christian Bale) alongside Bane (Tom Hardy). Check out the image of the two brawling with each other on-set:

Here’s an image of the Batpod for the upcoming Batman finale in Christopher Nolan’s trilogy:

Here is another image, of the caped crusader on-set, in full costume:

Pretty exciting stuff, huh? Here is a small video of an apparent explosion in a prison riot on the set, too:

Here is another recent image, depicting a battle between Batman and Bane. As you can see, there are police officers and prisoners fighting amidst them, so it may be a scene which is part of a huge prison break caused by Bane:

Exciting stuff indeed. Keep an eye out on the latest Batman news. The Dark Knight Rises is set to hit cinema screens on 20th July, 2o12.

By Manpreet Singh

No Copyright Infringement is intended with any of the above images or videos.


New Image Of Bane On-Set from ‘The Dark Knight Rises’

A new image of ‘The Dark Knight Rises’ villain, Bane has hit the net! The big man, who isn’t too keen on Batman, is being played by Tom Hardy (Inception, Bronson), and new images of him on-set and in his costume in Pittsburgh have been released. Check out the one I thought to be the best glimpse, below:

So, what do you reckon? Intimidating or what? You wouldn’t wanna cross this guy in a dark alley. Tom Hardy, who became especially popular after his portrayal of the character Eames in Christopher Nolan’s 2010 hit Inception, has reportedly gained 30lbs in weight in order to play the venom-filled beast who is apparently set to deal big damage to the Dark Knight in the upcoming third and final Batman installment from Christopher Nolan (who just turned 41 yesterday, if you didn’t know). Shooting is currently taking place in Pittsburgh, with numerous images and videos being caught, including this video of a few Tumblers getting ready for action:

Looks awesome, don’t you think? There appears to be three Tumblers, each with a slight difference to them. Has Bane managed to get his hands on them? Or is Batman just calling on ol’ pal Commissioner Gordon (Gary Oldman) to get behind the wheel again? Or is there a totally different explanation?

Numerous others have been seen on set, too, including Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Blake and Marion Cotillard as Wayne Enterprise Board Member and possible love interest to Bruce Wayne, Miranda Tate. Much more will be heading our way soon, so keep an eye out for constant updates.

The Dark Knight Rises is set to hit cinema screens on 20th July, 2012…less than a year away!

By Manpreet Singh


2001: A.I. Artificial Intelligence

Artifical Intelligence, in my opinion, is a classic movie. A visual masterpiece from Steven Spielberg, this movie is set in the near future, in which the manufacturing of robots occurs; but these aren’t any type of robots, but advanced, realistic, life-like robots (named mechas), which have been programmed to be as human as possible. However, although many types were manufactured, they still lacked some of the main elements that truly make a human, human, with one in particular – emotion. However, a further advanced prototype robot was created, called David (Haley Joel Osment) – a robot, created in the image of a young child, which has the ability to have emotions, in particular, the emotion of love towards his mother, Monica (Frances O’Connor), who adopted him as a substitute for her child who is in cryostasis due to having an incurable disease.

Problems begin to arise within the family, as a cure had been created for the child in stasis, meaning that he is able to return back home, and as a result, both David, and his now step-brother, Martin, feel obliged to compete for their mother’s love. Through this, Martin tricks David into doing several things which would make him appear unsafe to have as a ‘son’, and so Monica decides to return David back to the factory at which he was created, to be destroyed. However, a permanent imprint from Monica was put into David as she decided to permanently keep him, and being destroyed would be the only way to remove this imprinting. But David shows such genuine emotion towards her, even calling her mommy, to the extent that she cannot bear to have him destroyed, and so she drives him out to the woods and leaves him there. All the while, David, producing child-like emotions, becomes scared and worried, wondering why he has been abandoned by his mother, before wandering further into the woods.

David remembers a book his mother once read him before bed, the story of Pinocchio, and how the Blue Fairy granted wooden Pinocchio the wish of becoming a real boy. David, wanting nothing but the unconditional love of his mother, goes in search of the Blue Fairy, along the way, meeting countless different types of mechas, who have human appearances. He realises they are all discarded robots, and are being captured for recycling. Luckily, with the help of a few friendly and caring robots, including a robot programmed to please women – Gigolo Joe (Jude Law) manage to help. Joe decides to tag along with David, leading him to Rouge City, where Joe is convinced he will find the Blue Fairy.

The movie continues through a visually stunning, emotion-provoking futuristic journey, before David finds the Blue Fairy, only to be told it isn’t real by Professor Allen Hobby (William Hurt) – the man in charge of the company, Cybertronics, who created young David. David, in an attempt to escape from pursuers, travels underwater in an Amphibicopter, to an underwater city, which is in fact Coney Island. He becomes stuck in some rubble, but in the distance, sees a statue of a Blue Fairy. Two thousand years pass, and David is still there, staring at the fairy, before he is suddenly found and taken out of the water by an Alien species. This species has the ability to bring people back, but they need a DNA sample. David reveals he has a strand of hair from Monica, which he cut off her head (one of the things Martin made him to do try to get him into trouble).

His mother is brought back, and as David wished, he has been granted the wish by the mysterious yet graceful species, to become a real boy. However, the downside is that such resurrected people, as his mother, can only be brought back for a day. David finally lives a life in the day of a human, with his mother Monica, having the best day he has ever witnessed, laying with his mother at the end of the night, as she “falls asleep”…

This movie is perhaps one of the most realistically advanced movies I have ever seen. Throughout the movie, you can tell how much effort has been put into it, not only through the amazing special effects that have been used, providing brilliant visuals, but through the simple, yet brilliant storyline, adapted from the story of Pinocchio, ironically, being brought to life, in this beautifully crafted movie. There isn’t a lot of dialogue in this movie in comparison to most other movies, but such an amount is not required. The majority of this movie is heavily carried forward through its beautiful visuals, emotions, and its storyline, which even provokes emotions in the audience, as do the mysteriously eerie, yet brilliant futuristic representations.

However, the acting in this movie, especially on Osment’s part, is brilliant. How he manages to appear as an actual robot who has emotions, and being able to present these emotions in such a clear and strong manner, is spectacular. Throughout the whole movie, you actually feel as if he is a robot, determined to become a human. Ironic, that he has determination, something a human would have.

The main thing about this movie, though, is its representations of emotions, upon which it focuses on massively. It not only addresses the philosophy of emotions, connecting it to a sentient being, but also delves into these emotions, opening them up, and immersing you into them, through the movie and great acting.  Throughout the whole movie, it provokes your emotions, making you feel the suitable emotions that are being focused on in each given scene of the movie. It reflects our emotions as humans, through a being that isn’t actually human, in such a way that it makes you think about emotions, and what is actually is to be human. The idea of a robot feeling emotions digs even deeper into other topics of debate, including those of God and religion, and the value of life, and not just human life.

This is one of the most defining movies I have seen. One which definitely keeps you feeling a range of emotions throughout the movie, and thinking afterwards. A fantastic production, with a great cast, allowing a range of emotions to be provoked throughout – something a great movie should be able to do.

By Manpreet Singh


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