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The Dark Knight Rises: Is The Batwing Back?

We seem to be getting updates on Batman almost everyday now, and having just come back from my holiday yesterday, I have returned, as I guessed I would, to more big updates, including an image of the Nolan-esque Catwoman (Anne Hathaway) on set. However, as sexy as a woman in a leather cat outfit is, I’m pretty sure there has been a lot more uproar on the leak of some new videos and images showing another vehicle from Christopher Nolan’s upcoming Bat-finale, The Dark Knight Rises.

The most recent business online is that this peculiar vehicle may in fact be the Caped Crusader’s method of air transport – The Batwing. For those of you who remember Batman Forever, the Batwing was briefly used in the movie, before being taken down by Two-Face and The Riddler. However, although it had a pretty cool looking Batwing and was a better movie than Batman & Robin, Batman Forever isn’t even a tiny drop of water trailing down the side of the full glass of water that is Batman Begins and The Dark Knight; and other than Forever and the Batwing from Batman (1989), there aren’t really any huge versions of the Batwing to compare against, other than that portrayed in the comics. So perhaps The Dark Knight Rises will be the one to truly show off the amazing technology that Batman really packs…not that it needs to be any more amazing (I mean, a Batmobile…with a built-in motorbike?!) Check out a video of what may be the Batwing, being transported to the Wabash Tunnel in Pittsburgh:

I would say this is exciting stuff, but it would appear that this movie slowly seems to be getting ruined by the day, and with the possibility of some big spoilers having already been revealed, I really hope nothing else too major spills itself on to the internet before this release. However, I’m sure there are still plenty of big secrets under wraps which will remain there, and not to mention, it is The Dark Knight Rises, so how can you not be excited?!

The Dark Knight Rises is expected to hit cinema screens on the 20th July, 2012, so book a day off.

By Manpreet Singh


Akira

Akira was a revolutionary film which was made in 1988 directed by Katsuhiro Otomo based on the original manga. Akira was the first anime film to be properly recognized in the western society opening the road for future Japanese animation.

The film is based in 2019 after the third world war which happened in 1988 within this film. The opening scene involves a biker gang fight which introduces the main characters quickly and effectively. This quickly leads on to an event where one of the main characters is injured in an accident after coming in to contact with an unknown supernatural entity. This concludes with his friends discovering him in this state. While the characters are panicking they are surprised by an army helicopter blinding them. While this happens the injured character is abducted by the government. Once being abducted the character is found to have potential psychic abilities, thus being forced in to a secret program by the government.

This leads to a psychological thrill ride with a complex accompanying story. Some of the main points of this that makes the film great is the films ability to make you think. This film created questions in the mind of the viewer of how they would react if they were in the same situation. The main character is given such an immense power within the film he struggles to control this emotionally and physically. This allows the viewer to show empathy towards the main character allowing them to put themselves in the protagonist’s shoes asking the question ‘would I be able to control this power?’

Another major positive of this film is it does not force you to see the scenario this film presents from one characters view. It allows you to see parts of the film through the protagonist’s eyes as well as the main hero’s. This allows you to take a more analytical view upon the film sparking off an unbiased debate of your morality. This does have a negative aspect to itself as well. It stops the viewer forming a good emotional connection with one specific character but in the end allows a general overview of every character.

The film’s scenes are greatly complimented with its unique music. The music varies scene to scene appropriately sparking off emotion within the viewer allowing a greater connection to the plot, characters and the scenes. The film even in present age has dated very well being visual stunning still in this day and age.

To conclude this film it is a very enjoyable film allowing you to spark of debate within yourself about your own morality as well as pleasing visuals and music. The only main negative I can express is due to its presentation of characters it prevents the viewer from forming any emotional bond with an individual character. Well worth a watch if you get the chance.

Written by

Richard Broadhead (with input from Anthony Ball and Ben Leonard)


Laurence Fishburne Will Play Daily Planet Editor In ‘Superman: Man Of Steel’

Although the actual film is scheduled to be released in June 2013, almost all of the roles are already taken for the new reboot of Superman.
Laurence Fishburne is the newest addition as the Daily Planet Editor-in-chief, Perry White.

The new Perry White in the Superman reboot

I’m a little bit confused to the casting, he is a brilliant actor, but I do not think he suits this role at all. I always imagine the Daily Planet Editor-in-chief to be quite a nervous person, and lacking confidence. Laurence can do much stronger roles than this. However he is cast now.

Lets just hope this Superman reboot lives to expectations. Directed by Zack Snyder, Man of Steel is set to hit cinema screens on the 14th June, 2013 in the US, and will star Henry Cavill as Superman/Clark Kent, Amy Adams as Lois Lane, with the character of Jor-El to be played by Russell Crowe.

Source: Digital Spy